America’s Cup 2017 – How The Wealthy Play

Coinciding with our vacation to Bermuda last week, was the America’s Cup Yacht Preliminaries.

As seen from the bow of our cruise ship, Norwegian Breakaway, the America’s Cup Village is seen just behind Celebrity Summit, in Bermuda’s Great Sound.

Over the preceding months and many locations, preliminary races determined the ultimate “challenger” to the current “defender” (USA’s “Oracle.”) Above,  New Zealand’s “Emirates” (in contest with Great Britain’s “Land Rover”) takes the lead with Gibbs Hill Lighthouse in the background, and has now earned that challenger privilege.

The boats have evolved over 147 years, from more conventional sailing yachts, to highly refined and sophisticated racing platforms, now utilizing hydrofoils to significantly reduce drag and increase speed.

Rules prohibit any energy sources other than the sea, air and human input. The helmsman, (see image above) who is ultimately responsible for navigation and articulation of control surfaces under race conditions, must continuously evaluate and decide when and where to guide the boat and how to do it. His hands are on a multi-remote laced steering wheel. Also, as the boat’s direction and roll-attitude changes, the entire crew will run across to the opposite (upper) pontoon to man duplicate stations.  Great theater! 

Just after winning this heat over Land Rover, Emirates is seen here coming down off the foils. The boats often exceed 44 knots (50 mph) in racing.

Although all the 50′ catamarans  are essencially the same, teams have virtually unlimited options as to trimming and power usage, including navigating savvy, and human endurance.  For example, Emirates utilizes bicycle-like human power stations, while Oracle uses the more traditional hand cranked “grinders.”  The science of these vessels and the methods employed are awesome, details of which can be found here .     

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

Posted in America's Cup, Bermuda, Boating, Cruise ship, Curiosities, Photography, Sailing, Science, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

On The Road to Tobacco Bay, Bermuda


Last week, we cruised to Bermuda from NYC on the 145,000 gross ton Norwegian Breakaway. Day six of this family vacation brought us to St. George via the ferry  and a short walk to Tobacco Bay, on the far north shore for swimming, snorkling and exploring, 

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

Posted in Bermuda, Cruise, Cruise ship, Vacation | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Buffalo, Paris, and Chimney Pots.

Twenty four years ago I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express on Chippewa and Main in Buffalo, NY,  and was intrigued by the adjoining roof top of an early 20th century two-story building, rimmed with tens of classic chimney pots. 

Years later while in France, the view from the Eiffel Tower brought those chimney pots to mind…

Just for perspective because I like the image, here is a view from the top-level of the Eiffel Tower on September 25, 2012. I wonder how many of these “pots” would be within this view! 

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

Posted in Art, Buildings, Curiosities, History, Mystery, Photography | Tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Ahh, the Ponte de Rialto on Canal Grande in Venice, Italy and …Seaside Heights, N.J.

Seaside Heights, New Jersey – May, 2014

Venice, Italy – April, 2011 

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

Posted in Buildings, Italy, New jersey, Photography, Travel, Vacation | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Things that Go Around, Come Around!

If you were to compare almost anything from ~100 years ago to today’s version, it  would probably be very different,  like…phones. But not everything! 

 

Grandpa’s wheel, 1921                                      Debbie’s wheel, 2017      

Thanks for viewing and comments are always welcomed. M:-)

Posted in 1920's, Cars, Model T, Photography, Pondering | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

The Hudson River, Presidents, and Ghosts

A while back I pondered the source of the Hudson River, coursing 315 miles from the slopes of Mt. Marcy, (the highest peak in the Adirondacks of New York State,) to the southern tip of Manhattan. So I went there!

At 5,348 ft (1,629m) Mt. Marcy and other mountains of the High Peaks Region shed snow melt and rainwater via thousands of trickling rivulets, forming creeks and streams that feed Henderson Lake, 7.5 miles (12 km) ESE of Marcy’s summit.

ABOVE: A portion of pristine Henderson Lake, of which its out-flow is considered the named start of the Hudson River. Folklore cites a small glacial pond, “Tear of the Clouds” (about 7 miles to the ENE, and higher up on the southern slopes of Mt. Marcy,) as the source of the river, spurring a debate based on “longest length,” vs. “highest elevation” as relevent to proper naming.

 Immediately coming out of Henderson Lake, this stream is officially the first water known as the “Hudson River,” seen from the first bridge. A hiking trail to the High Peaks starts here. 

Just south, the Mac Naughton Cottage, is one of a dozen or so abandoned buildings on the west bank of the “Hudson River.”

In 1827, a mining operation was begun here. Although certainly not a concern at the time, it arguably affected the downstream quality of the river.  (Subsequent pollution sources, such as PCB’s far out-weighed the environmental impact in later years but nonetheless, this operation was large, and spewed mountains of slag and tailings which are still prominent today.)  The initial venture closed in 1857 due to transportation costs and….mysterious impurities in the iron ore. Many years later, MacIntyre Mine as it became known, was obtained by NL Industries, and before closing permanentaly in 1982 produced over 40 million tons of titanium  …the strange impurity in the iron ore.  See here for more information. 1982 would mark the end of mining activity leaving behind the Tahawus Ghost Town .

Slightly over 300 miles to the south, the George Washington Bridge is the last span over the Hudson River, as seen in the header image. 

An interesting side note from this area is depicted on the nearby signage shown below. Vice President Theodore Roosevelt was vacationing at the above cottage in 1901. He was advised while hiking on Mt. Marcy, that the current President, William McKinley, had taken a turn for the worst after an assassination attempt the week before in Buffalo, several hundred miles away. Determined to get to the President’s bedside as soon as possible, Roosevelt and a driver risked treacherous and frightening overnight conditions on a horse drawn buckboard to the nearest railroad connection in North Creek six or seven hours away.  During this time, at 2:15 AM, President William McKinley succumbed, as Roosevelt was still negotiating the dark, back country terrain. Contrary to the wording on the sign and elsewhere, he would be sworn in as the 26th President of the United States later that day in Buffalo. 

Note: At the time of my visit I shot these photographs on film.  Thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M :-

Posted in Daytrip, Exploring, History, Hudson River, New York, Photography | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Looking Up Perspective!

 

No, this is not a thesaurus.   It’s just a perspective! 

Wednesday was an unusually cold day for March 22nd, but brilliantly clear as a chance intersection was happening overhead. Around 4500′ (2480 m,) the United  jet was on a base leg approaching Newark Airport while the two high altitude planes were cruising SW,  likely near 30,000 ft. (16,500 m.) 

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

Posted in Airplanes, Close Up, New jersey, Photography, Planes, Pondering, Telephoto | Tagged | 6 Comments